Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

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Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby zetreque on June 14th, 2016, 7:30 pm 

I have been reading lots of studies about anthropogenic noise having negative effects on humans and wildlife.

We have always been puzzled by how animals achieve great migrations. One such idea is a magnetic compass built into some creatures. Here is an article that proposes bird migrations happen in part by bird's ability to hear soundscapes hundreds of miles away.

After Tens of Thousands of Pigeons Vanish, One Comes Back
Robert Krulwich, National Geographic 05/26/16
http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/05/26/after-tens-of-thousands-of-pigeons-vanish-one-comes-back/

I find this to be a good proposal. From my own experience I am attuned to how every location I have ever traveled has a unique smell to it. There is also a very unique soundscape to it. If you record the spectrum of any location on the planet you can get a unique soundscape or imprint.

NOVA | What Do Healthy Ecosystems Sound Like?


There is a lot of news in the world of ocean noise pollution right now.
This is the Obama administration’s new plan to stop devastating ocean noise pollution
By Chelsea Harvey June 6, Washington Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/06/06/this-is-the-obama-administrations-new-plan-to-stop-devastating-ocean-noise-pollution/

There are heaps of studies showing noise affecting terrestrial life, and there is more evidence and studies showing ocean going anthropogenic noise interrupting ocean life. These studies of noise affecting wildlife are popping up all the time and more often. This got me to thinking about turtle migrations. I only found this article related to turtles and noise.
Y., Samuel, et al. "Underwater, Low-Frequency Noise In A Coastal Sea Turtle Habitat." Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 117.3 (2005): 1465-1472

I see soundscape ecology as an extremely exciting field of research popping up. Our limited sensory capabilities of humans make it easy for us to dismiss so much else going on in the world. I am amazed at where my path has lead me on this journey of becoming aware of sound and it's biological impact. This idea of soundscapes being used for navigation seems very plausible to me and so far I have not found anything on it.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby zetreque on June 14th, 2016, 8:23 pm 

Just saw that there is a new documentary about ocean noise pollution too.

http://www.takepart.com/video/2016/05/16/sonic-sea-documentary-ocean-noise-pollution-whales-dolphins-fish?cmpid=tpdaily-eml-2016-05-20-A

PS: speaking of docs, there's another new documentary called "In pursuit of Silence" if interested.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby Serpent on June 14th, 2016, 8:26 pm 

I have been hearing about ocean noise from time to time, mainly in regard to the navigation ability of whales. More often, though,Ii hear about light pollution and migrating birds.

We humans have gigantic footprints!

I'll check out the documentary later tonight, when I have the screen to myself.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby BadgerJelly on June 15th, 2016, 5:27 am 

Yeah, we don't stop to consider other life forms and how they navigate through life. The Yellow River is the most common example of our affect. First the dolphins went blind due to human agriculture muddying the river, then with the induction of motorised boats we "blinded" their eco-location.

I am also curious about the effects of EMF on wildlife. Given that EMF does have effects upon humans I find it hard to imagine that some other species out there is suffering more dramatically than a handful of us are.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby vivian maxine on June 15th, 2016, 9:59 am 

Or even how noise affects humans, when you come right down to it.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby Serpent on June 15th, 2016, 1:56 pm 

vivian maxine » June 15th, 2016, 8:59 am wrote:Or even how noise affects humans, when you come right down to it.

Now, that would be an interesting study!
.... I said to myself... and eager little studious self ran right off to find some.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/554566_3
We really need to be a lot quieter. The demise of the internal combustion engine and its replacement with solar-electric models will be a great boon to both man- and other-kind.

I've just been watching this beautiful thing ( I mean the airplane. )
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby zetreque on June 15th, 2016, 2:35 pm 

I have a whole bunch of studies I've collected on noise affecting humans. I was planning on putting that into another thread in the future when I can write it out. This thread I thought was the most interesting of my findings... Noise and animal migration. I was skeptical of noise impacting humans, but once I started looking into it... Stay tuned. :)
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby Serpent on June 15th, 2016, 2:37 pm 

Sorry! Didn't mean to jump on it prematurely. But it's just so gal-darned important!
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby vivian maxine on June 15th, 2016, 3:21 pm 

zetreque » June 15th, 2016, 1:35 pm wrote:I have a whole bunch of studies I've collected on noise affecting humans. I was planning on putting that into another thread in the future when I can write it out. This thread I thought was the most interesting of my findings... Noise and animal migration. I was skeptical of noise impacting humans, but once I started looking into it... Stay tuned. :)


We await. This one is more worth spending time thinking over because we are doing it to them. What we do to ourselves is our problem.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby Braininvat on June 15th, 2016, 6:48 pm 

I've been thinking about the benefits of high-speed rail over jets, and this reminds me that noise abatement is one of them. Fascinating/disturbing about the pigeons knocked off course by an SST shockwave. Good thread.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby zetreque on June 15th, 2016, 7:29 pm 

Braininvat » Wed Jun 15, 2016 3:48 pm wrote:I've been thinking about the benefits of high-speed rail over jets, and this reminds me that noise abatement is one of them. Fascinating/disturbing about the pigeons knocked off course by an SST shockwave. Good thread.


Do you think high speed rail would be all that much quieter? Do they use horns at crossings? The duration of train noise would be longer than jet noise also. So even if it's quieter you must take into account duration. Just some thoughts.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby zetreque on June 23rd, 2016, 9:29 pm 

I didn't know this. This looks like it has the potential to really screw up migrations as well.

Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields disrupt magnetic alignment of ruminants.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19299504

Abstract

Resting and grazing cattle and deer tend to align their body axes in the geomagnetic North-South direction. The mechanism(s) that underlie this behavior remain unknown. Here, we show that extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELFMFs) generated by high-voltage power lines disrupt alignment of the bodies of these animals with the geomagnetic field. Body orientation of cattle and roe deer was random on pastures under or near power lines. Moreover, cattle exposed to various magnetic fields directly beneath or in the vicinity of power lines trending in various magnetic directions exhibited distinct patterns of alignment. The disturbing effect of the ELFMFs on body alignment diminished with the distance from conductors. These findings constitute evidence for magnetic sensation in large mammals as well as evidence of an overt behavioral reaction to weak ELFMFs in vertebrates. The demonstrated reaction to weak ELFMFs implies effects at the cellular and molecular levels.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby vivian maxine on June 24th, 2016, 8:43 am 

zetreque » June 23rd, 2016, 8:29 pm wrote:I didn't know this. This looks like it has the potential to really screw up migrations as well.

Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields disrupt magnetic alignment of ruminants.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19299504

Abstract

Resting and grazing cattle and deer tend to align their body axes in the geomagnetic North-South direction. The mechanism(s) that underlie this behavior remain unknown. Here, we show that extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELFMFs) generated by high-voltage power lines disrupt alignment of the bodies of these animals with the geomagnetic field. Body orientation of cattle and roe deer was random on pastures under or near power lines. Moreover, cattle exposed to various magnetic fields directly beneath or in the vicinity of power lines trending in various magnetic directions exhibited distinct patterns of alignment. The disturbing effect of the ELFMFs on body alignment diminished with the distance from conductors. These findings constitute evidence for magnetic sensation in large mammals as well as evidence of an overt behavioral reaction to weak ELFMFs in vertebrates. The demonstrated reaction to weak ELFMFs implies effects at the cellular and molecular levels.



Would that tie in with what cattle and horses do during storms? I cannot remember which is which but one faces into a storm and the other faces away from a storm. I think it is horses that face into the storm. Or so my father always told me.
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Re: Noise Pollution and wildlife migration

Postby zetreque on June 24th, 2016, 8:53 pm 

This "Rossby Whistle" could also be responsible for marine and bird migrations.


A strange, low-pitched sound is coming from the Caribbean Sea
FIONA MACDONALD
22 JUN 2016
http://www.sciencealert.com/a-strange-low-pitched-sound-is-coming-from-the-caribbean-sea
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