Sexual identity in the UK 2014

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Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby wolfhnd on October 1st, 2015, 4:53 am 

"1.6% of adults in the UK identified their sexual identity as lesbian, gay or bisexual in 2014."

http://visual.ons.gov.uk/sexual-identit ... e-uk-2014/

Huge difference between these numbers and the estimates provided by sociologist?
wolfhnd
 


Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Natural ChemE on October 1st, 2015, 6:07 am 

wolfhnd,

You know what the most commonly claimed sexual identity at my university is?
    Image.
Yup, that's an Apache helicopter.

Other common sexual identities include race cars, rocket ships, dinosaurs, and students who aced the last exam. The idea behind the last one is that, if you sexually identify as a student who aced the exam, then either the instructor changes your grade to an A or you threaten to sue.

It's a big joke because people are supposedly allowed to pick what they identify as regardless of how they actually behave. For example, some folks will claim to be straight despite homosexual relationships, arguing that they ultimately intend to marry and start a family.

I'm not sure about the studies you're looking at, but my first thought is that there may be some confusion related to labels that people claim vs. labels that describe behavior.

Of course there are also issues with rigor when we're talking social sciences, though that's nothing new.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Natural ChemE on October 1st, 2015, 6:20 am 

Separately, gender identities are kinda weird like this too.

For example, Facebook recently added the option for users to come up with arbitrary gender identities. Huh, I barely ever use Facebook, but I guess I can go ahead and officially declare myself an Apache now...

Anyway, the same article notes that the UK had 70 options instead of 58. Not sure if that's significant to the topic of sexual identities in the UK or not, but it sounds like there's something there.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Ursa Minimus on October 1st, 2015, 8:50 am 

wolfhnd » October 1st, 2015, 2:53 am wrote:"1.6% of adults in the UK identified their sexual identity as lesbian, gay or bisexual in 2014."

http://visual.ons.gov.uk/sexual-identit ... e-uk-2014/

Huge difference between these numbers and the estimates provided by sociologist?



If you take all people who did NOT answer "hetero", then the number is 7.2%. Is that more in the ballpark of whatever number you were thinking of? That number does seem in line with other numbers from the UK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demograph ... ed_Kingdom

Note that the numbers are higher for younger people. Social stigma affects survey responses. How many people who identify as heterosexual have had or have sex with someone of the same sex? The number is not zero. Is stigma higher in the UK on this stuff than the USA? I don't know, but I do know that asking people to declare a stigmatized identity in a survey produces a bias on the responses that underestimates those with those stigmatized identities. True in general, not just for sexuality.

Comparing surveys of US and UK done by the same organization in the same year:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demograph ... ed_Kingdom

2015

In a Yougov survey of 1,632 adults, 5.5% identified as gay, 2.1% as bisexual, and 88.7% as heterosexual.[35]



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_demo ... ted_States

2015

In a Yougov survey of 1,000 adults, 2% of the sample identified as a gay male, 2% as gay female, 4% as bisexual (of either sex), and 89% as heterosexual.[46]



Both around 11% non-hetero. Is that the number you were thinking of? Because in terms of "any sexual attraction to the same sex" that is pretty spot on for the USA, from what I know of the research.

Sociologists (specifically) actually provide a lot of different numbers. Self declared identity vs. having sexual contact with someone of the same sex vs same sex attraction. The numbers are very different. Some even go so far as to ask about any sexual contact at any age, not just post puberty. The survey methodology matters too, a great deal. Phone, paper, in person, the ways the questions are asked, whether the survey is a general one that asks questions about sexuality, or a survey specifically about sexuality, etc.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby BioWizard on October 1st, 2015, 11:50 am 

Ursa Minimus » 01 Oct 2015 07:50 am wrote:Sociologists (specifically) actually provide a lot of different numbers. Self declared identity vs. having sexual contact with someone of the same sex vs same sex attraction. The numbers are very different.


That's good. It would seem that self-declared anything tells us more about the society rather than just the individual. So I'd be more interested in what the other numbers are, if I'm trying to learn about the actual distribution of individual proclivities. It's kind of hard to take self-declared identities at face value, when there is so much social stigma and real perceptible consequences to what a person declares about him/her-self. But I'm sure I'm mostly stating the obvious here.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby TheVat on October 1st, 2015, 12:48 pm 

Stigma varies so much in American society, it seems like. I've seen social circles where people declare themselves to be gay because they want to show hipness and solidarity with gays, and they turn out to be bisexuals who end up marrying the opposite sex after sowing some youthful wild oats. So, yeah, self-declaration has so many contextual influences. In other circles, such as might be found in Utah or Wyoming, self-declaration of any non-hetero proclivity is pretty rare. But the sheep often look nervous. JK
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby wolfhnd on October 2nd, 2015, 12:50 am 

I suppose that exclusively and predominately may be a relevant concept here for any self identifying group.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby wolfhnd on October 2nd, 2015, 4:48 am 

There is an interesting article that argues that fetishes do not exist

"The terms fetish and paraphilias marginalize and pathologize natural and healthy sexual interests. At the very least, clinical catalogs of paraphilias should be modified to more accurately reflect the true patterns of sexual interests in the population."

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/bi ... -not-exist

The article in the OP caught my attention because I think a similar argument could be made that strictly speaking sexual identity is a concept that has the same limited utility. Not only do sexual orientations change over time but sexual behavior may not reflect any strict categorization of individuals. People may engage in a variety of sexual behavior some of which may not even reflect a preference. The goal then becomes one in which we accurately reflect the true patterns of sexual interests in the population not a rigidly defined orientation.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Ursa Minimus on October 2nd, 2015, 7:19 am 

Braininvat » October 1st, 2015, 10:48 am wrote:Stigma varies so much in American society, it seems like. I've seen social circles where people declare themselves to be gay because they want to show hipness and solidarity with gays, and they turn out to be bisexuals who end up marrying the opposite sex after sowing some youthful wild oats. So, yeah, self-declaration has so many contextual influences. In other circles, such as might be found in Utah or Wyoming, self-declaration of any non-hetero proclivity is pretty rare. But the sheep often look nervous. JK


Consider that, no matter what they person thinks and does in their social circle, a phone based survey might still have them question whether they want to say the same thing to the person on the other end as they do to the people around them.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Ursa Minimus on October 2nd, 2015, 8:12 am 

BioWizard » October 1st, 2015, 9:50 am wrote:
Ursa Minimus » 01 Oct 2015 07:50 am wrote:Sociologists (specifically) actually provide a lot of different numbers. Self declared identity vs. having sexual contact with someone of the same sex vs same sex attraction. The numbers are very different.


That's good. It would seem that self-declared anything tells us more about the society rather than just the individual. So I'd be more interested in what the other numbers are, if I'm trying to learn about the actual distribution of individual proclivities. It's kind of hard to take self-declared identities at face value, when there is so much social stigma and real perceptible consequences to what a person declares about him/her-self. But I'm sure I'm mostly stating the obvious here.


From what I know of the current research (some, not a great deal), around 11% of the population has some sort of same sex attraction as adults.

What I don't know is whether or not that is relatively constant, or if childhood socialization can change those adult numbers over the decades. But given that numbers tend to top out around 10% for various methodologies for decades of time since Kinsey, I think we can treat that number as a constant for most purposes. At least for the moment.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby wolfhnd on October 2nd, 2015, 8:55 pm 

Ursa Minimus » Fri Oct 02, 2015 12:12 pm wrote:
From what I know of the current research (some, not a great deal), around 11% of the population has some sort of same sex attraction as adults.


There in is the interesting question, what do we mean by attraction? Is finding someone sexually stimulating the same as thinking of them as a potential mate? This would obviously apply to hetrosexuals as well as other declare preferences.

The other question I have is why are these surveys conducted, what do they hope to uncover and how is that information useful?
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Dave_Oblad on October 2nd, 2015, 11:23 pm 

Hi wolfhnd,

wolfhnd wrote:The other question I have is why are these surveys conducted, what do they hope to uncover and how is that information useful?

I'd say that heterosexuals need to know if they are still ok ;^P

Regards,
Dave :^)
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby wolfhnd on October 3rd, 2015, 1:22 am 

Dave_Oblad » Sat Oct 03, 2015 3:23 am wrote:Hi wolfhnd,

wolfhnd wrote:The other question I have is why are these surveys conducted, what do they hope to uncover and how is that information useful?

I'd say that heterosexuals need to know if they are still ok ;^P

Regards,
Dave :^)


Hi Dave

I kind of had the same thought but it seems a bit petty for any kind of researcher.

What I really want to know now is what percent of the population is exclusively homosexual. I did some digging on the web but I'm not really satisfied with the information I could find. I don't think exclusively homosexual excludes hetrosexual acts but would be indicated by some sort of bonding. As far as I know there is no conclusive evidence that humans are "naturally" monogamous but there is circumstantial evidence that human pair bond. As Ursa pointed out there is a problem with definitions here that I'm having a little problem getting past. I'm assuming that homosexual pair bonding exists or what is conventionally called falling in love exists but human sexuallity is a murky subject at best. What is clear is that being in love does not exclude sexual relations outside the pair bond and some animals that in the past were considered monogamous it turns out have much more elaborate sexual agendas.
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Re: Sexual identity in the UK 2014

Postby Ursa Minimus on October 3rd, 2015, 8:21 am 

wolfhnd » October 2nd, 2015, 11:22 pm wrote:
Dave_Oblad » Sat Oct 03, 2015 3:23 am wrote:Hi wolfhnd,

wolfhnd wrote:The other question I have is why are these surveys conducted, what do they hope to uncover and how is that information useful?

I'd say that heterosexuals need to know if they are still ok ;^P

Regards,
Dave :^)


Hi Dave

I kind of had the same thought but it seems a bit petty for any kind of researcher.

What I really want to know now is what percent of the population is exclusively homosexual. I did some digging on the web but I'm not really satisfied with the information I could find. I don't think exclusively homosexual excludes hetrosexual acts but would be indicated by some sort of bonding.


wolfhnd,

No time to dig. The census bureau reports about 1% of households are same sex. But you might consider looking at this to see if there is anything of interest in there to you, irt methodology :

http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Censu ... 015-12.pdf

It's about errors in measurement. Compared to married hetero couples, same sex married couples are estimated to be mis-coded in the data (inconsistent relationship and sex answers) 5.5X as often, and same sex unmarried couples 3.4X as often. (Table 3).
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