final year project advice

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final year project advice

Postby Highwaystar101 on August 25th, 2008, 10:34 am 

I am starting a final year project for my third year of university. I have chosen to write about the development of autosterescopic display systems. I have read widely around the subject and I have conducted a lot of research over the summer and gathered plenty of literature (a lot of which still needs to be processed thoroughly)

Just wandering, seeing as you lot seem to be a bright bunch, any tips for my project?

Or just the dreaded third year in general would be useful lol
Highwaystar101
 


Re: final year project advice

Postby mtbturtle on August 25th, 2008, 11:34 am 

Highwaystar101 wrote:I am starting a final year project for my third year of university. I have chosen to write about the development of autosterescopic display systems. I have read widely around the subject and I have conducted a lot of research over the summer and gathered plenty of literature (a lot of which still needs to be processed thoroughly)

Just wandering, seeing as you lot seem to be a bright bunch, any tips for my project?

Or just the dreaded third year in general would be useful :)


Hi Highway

Good luck with the project.

I'm betting you'll get more and better suggestions up in one of the SCF forums. Stuff in the Lounge gets overlooked by many of the users. I can either move it up to SCF for you or maybe one of the other scf mods can. If you want let me know. :-)
Last edited by mtbturtle on August 25th, 2008, 2:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Stereonometry as Philosophy

Postby PeSla on August 25th, 2008, 1:26 pm 

Highwaystar101,

I concur that this is a rather technical and scientific question- but I would like to mention in terms of perception and cognition we have a great deal of discussion in the PCF, philosophy forum also. I suppose it is a question of how you approach the subject and what is expected for success in the completion of such a project. Things like color and cognition is perhaps part of the field and mathematics of vectors- but logic is discussed in both forums.

In fact, if it comes down to proposals for a logic of transition from two to three space you can find original methods of programming such things by theories here too. I would be interested in how you have approached the subject and what directions you think your research will take- posts that definitely belong in the science forum if in technical language. I take it you are more oriented to the algorithmic aspects of such things?
PeSla
 


Postby Highwaystar101 on August 26th, 2008, 5:25 am 

Thanks guys,

If you think moving it to a busier forum section that would be very handy thankyou.

As for my approach, I am going to look at the development and integration of the technolgy into more mainstream use. I believe that the two are coupled and are dependant on each other.

But it's early days. It is just a subject matter that fascinates me.
Highwaystar101
 


Postby Nick on August 26th, 2008, 6:37 am 

I can't give any specific advice but I have done this kind of thing a couple of times this year and will be doing another next year (ok, maybe I technically should have started it already but there are only so many projects you can do in parallel) so I can give a little general advice:

Have an actual plan of what you will be doing- it's way to easy to go down an interesting path and then realise shortly before you are meant to submit that you wasted most of the year doing interesting but not particularly useful stuff.

Try to arrange regular (every week or so) meetings with someone who knows about and has some interest in your project (like your partner and/or supervisor). This is helpful to avoid the above and also forces you to recognise the things that you don't but should know about your project. How well this works can be quite variable depending on how your supervisor works.

Log everything you do in your lab book and keep a suitable filesystem set up for your data. You should be able to go back and reanalyse old data and explain all the details that you will forget. A decent system of taking notes from and storing all the papers you use is also helpful when it comes to writing up.

Keep your final report in mind throughout the year, don't ignore it and try to write it all at the last minute. It will be much better if you draft parts of it when they are relevant. If you have done a lot of reading and things already you can plan out the introduction fairly well. Writing up experimental methods is much easier and more accurate if done around the time of the experiment rather than months later.
Nick
 



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