Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's be justified?

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Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's be justified?

Postby Alan McDougall on July 19th, 2016, 7:17 am 

Do you think that Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's should be legalised as an act of kindness to put the sufferer and the sufferers family out of their misiery be justified?

We extend this kindness to our beloved pets, thus why should this not be an option for humans?

Regards

Alan
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Re: Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's be justified?

Postby Serpent on July 19th, 2016, 8:19 am 

This is not the state's decision to make. It is not the church's decision to make. It is not the family's decision to make. Everybody has the innate right to decide when to end his or her life.

If you can't speak or write when the time comes, your wishes should have been coherently expressed at some earlier time, and those wishes should be legally binding on the executors. That only leaves the unfortunate children who are irreparably damaged before they could express any wishes regarding the quality of their life and the circumstances of their death.
If I say those dependents should be regarded with the same compassion as pets; somebody responsible should make the decision whether their suffering was great enough to relieve, many people will revile me. Indeed, some of the same people who have no quibble with war, unrelieved famine and capital punishment. Human sentiment is a very strange thing!
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Re: Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's be justified?

Postby Braininvat on July 19th, 2016, 10:04 am 

Alan, I wonder if one impediment is that many people simply haven't grasped fully the internal death that is Alzheimers, that the end stage is an oblivion from which no one is going to miraculously return. I think our amazing modern medicine has nurtured a false hope that anyone, no matter how far gone, might have an 11th hour cure. It's similar to the denial that attends a persistent vegetative state in a comatose person. They see a human form, they believe that somehow someone is still "there."
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Re: Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's be justified?

Postby Alan McDougall on July 19th, 2016, 10:05 am 

Serpent » July 19th, 2016, 2:19 pm wrote:This is not the state's decision to make. It is not the church's decision to make. It is not the family's decision to make. Everybody has the innate right to decide when to end his or her life.

If you can't speak or write when the time comes, your wishes should have been coherently expressed at some earlier time, and those wishes should be legally binding on the executors. That only leaves the unfortunate children who are irreparably damaged before they could express any wishes regarding the quality of their life and the circumstances of their death.
If I say those dependents should be regarded with the same compassion as pets; somebody responsible should make the decision whether their suffering was great enough to relieve, many people will revile me. Indeed, some of the same people who have no quibble with war, unrelieved famine and capital punishment. Human sentiment is a very strange thing!


You are right it should be the express desire of the Alzheimer suffer while still in his/hers full facilities and nearly full mental capacity.


But sorry to be so graphic
, if no such statement is made by the sufferer the family would be left to look after an empty shell not much more than a zombie a horrifying left over of what was there previously highly intelligent loved one.

One end state sufferer I knew about had been reduced to a grunting vegetable and had to be forced fed to be kept alive, is this then not a real moral and ethical dilemma as what the real kind act one should do for this person ?

If one took the religious view it would seem the soul had left the body, which was just a mindless object not really human at all. Or the evolutionary point of view that the person was void of consciousness and was a walking dead thing.

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Re: Euthanasia for end stage Alzheimer's be justified?

Postby Serpent on July 19th, 2016, 10:46 am 

Alan McDougall » July 19th, 2016, 9:05 am wrote:
But sorry to be so graphic[/u], if no such statement is made by the sufferer the family would be left to look after an empty shell not much more than a zombie a horrifying left over of what was there previously highly intelligent loved one.

And it's not all that unusual for the closest responsible relative, often in accord with a health-care professional, to end that burdensome life. kind people look the other way. Sane primitives didn't hesitate to take the practical course of action, without subterfuge. A reasonable society would acknowledge what that course of action is and stop putting makeup on the corpses. We're not quite there yet, and in the case of the very young, we're even more cruelly sanctimonious.

If one took the religious view it would seem the soul had left the body, which was just a mindless object not really human at all.

Ah, but God had not yet voided His effigy, and tending it is a test or penance for the family. Or whatever nonsense they come up with to evade responsibility for their own circumstances.
Or the evolutionary point of view that the person was void of consciousness and was a walking dead thing.

In some conditions, that state can be determined. In some, it is difficult or impossible as yet to establish degree of mental capacity by any scientific measure, and we have to fall back on empathy. (If I were trapped in there, conscious and cognizant, what would I wish they had the decency to do for me? The legal positions, of course, is not about common sense or compassion; it's about political expediency. Enough people have to demand it before a law can be passed.
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