Mesa Verde

Discussions unearthing human history including cultural anthropology, linguistics, etc.

Mesa Verde

Postby vivian maxine on September 1st, 2016, 8:44 am 

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2016060 ... 016_travel

Mesa Verde is not only an inspirational place to visit, it is probably the most educational vacation I ever had, perhaps the only site I'd place ahead of Cahokia in southern Illinois. I can imagine archaeologists having a field day studying the place.

The big cliff dwelling shown here is easily accessed and open to the public. But there are others high on sheer walls, making one wonder how anybody ever got up there. I watched two people climb one such wall - definitely forbidden by the park service - but there they were. And they made it all the way! Imagine living like that!

This little article - from BBC newsletter - doesn't tell much of the history. It is more of a biography of the man who changed how Mesa Verde is presented to tourists. But, if you like archaeology and history, it may tempt you. Our Native Americans were not - as one man put it - "doing nothing with the land God gave us". They had an advanced civilization.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014


Re: Mesa Verde

Postby bangstrom on September 2nd, 2016, 4:34 am 

If you walk the steep hillsides around Mesa Verde you can find an amazing number of tiny stone dams like the ones children make when they see a trickle of water. The dams were used to trap every drop of water for what must have been equally small gardens.

The settlement at Cahokia defied the rule that Native American communities had to move every few decades to find new places to grow corn because growing corn depletes the soil. Much of their diet came from the woods which helped. They had deer, rabbits, walnuts, hickory nuts, and pawpaws "Indiana bananas."
bangstrom
Member
 
Posts: 497
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
vivian maxine liked this post


Re: Mesa Verde

Postby Serpent on September 2nd, 2016, 4:30 pm 

I've always been fascinated by cliff-dwellings. I suppose there must have been a bristling maze of ladders connecting friends, relatives, meeting places and store-houses. A cliff village, fully inhabited and going about its daily life would really be something to see! (Don't you sometimes wish for past-viewer? But then, spying on people is creepy, so we wouldn't. )

The fortifications depicted on that site are a considerable architectural achievement, not substantially different from their European counterparts. Every one of those stones had to be measured, shaped, carried up a ladder, placed, fitted and secured by hand.
I have to wonder at modern people say things like, "Back then, they didn't know..." In fact, they knew rather a lot more about many things than we do.
Serpent
Resident Member
 
Posts: 3143
Joined: 24 Dec 2011


Re: Mesa Verde

Postby bangstrom on January 16th, 2017, 2:39 am 

QUOTE vivian maxine "...perhaps the only site I'd place ahead of Cahokia in southern Illinois. I can imagine archaeologists having a field day studying the place."

This is what happened to the west end of the Cahokia site.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid ... 007&type=3
bangstrom
Member
 
Posts: 497
Joined: 18 Sep 2014


Re: Mesa Verde

Postby vivian maxine on January 16th, 2017, 7:36 am 

bangstrom » January 16th, 2017, 1:39 am wrote:QUOTE vivian maxine "...perhaps the only site I'd place ahead of Cahokia in southern Illinois. I can imagine archaeologists having a field day studying the place."

This is what happened to the west end of the Cahokia site.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid ... 007&type=3



Thank you, bangstrom.
vivian maxine
Resident Member
 
Posts: 2837
Joined: 01 Aug 2014



Return to Archaeology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests