Food fermentation in the stomach

Discussions related to nutrition or medical research. Please remember that this is a discussion forum, not a medical advice dispensing forum.

Moderator: neuro


Food fermentation in the stomach

Postby cloudy-a on January 24th, 2007, 4:11 pm 

My dad told me the other day that I should never eat fruit at night because it will ferment in your stomach as you sleep and therefore release "toxins" that are harmful to the body. I am very dubious about the logic behind this as first of all, I don't see any reason why fermentation should occur overnight as opposed to eating fruit first thing in the morning. Plus, I didn't think fermetation was the process by which sugars were broken down in our stomach.

But, I don't know a whole lot about digestion, so is it possible that what my dad is telling me is possible?
User avatar
cloudy-a
Member
 
Posts: 221
Joined: 19 Jan 2007
Location: Miami Beach, FL


Postby graemhoek on January 24th, 2007, 4:53 pm 

No. Peristalsis does slow down at night along with all of your other processes.... that might even make it the best time to eat something healthy like berries or other fruits loaded with vitamins and anti-oxidants because your small intestine will have more time to leach the nutrients out of them.

Additionally, there is no real fermentation in the stomach given that the pH is usually less than 2. The stomach is where proteins are denatured by HCl and various trypsins. Unless you eat live yeast cultures and anti-acids with your fruit... you should be fine.
User avatar
graemhoek
Member
 
Posts: 868
Joined: 26 Jul 2006
Location: florida


Postby Tranquil on January 24th, 2007, 5:30 pm 

From my point of view, fermentation is process that requires anaerobic conditions. And stomach does not fulfill this condition at 100%. As Gramhoek mentioned, because of low pH, there are just few bacteria that could serve for fermentation. Mainly, fermentation in humans occurs in large intestine, where 99,1% of bacteria goes anaerobically. I also eat fruit before I go sleep, it makes me nothing. Im not nutrition specialist, but I think, that eating more "alkali" like bananna is better than "acid-fruit" like citrus fruit . . . :) And I recommend milk, this is the best for me.
User avatar
Tranquil
Member
 
Posts: 187
Joined: 17 Aug 2006
Location: Nimbrethil forest


Postby cloudy-a on January 24th, 2007, 5:49 pm 

So, say my dad got it wrong and he meant fermentation by E.coli in the gut or the colon, not in the stomach (English is not his first language so he would translate "gut" to mean stomach). Would this be harmful? I don't mean severely harmful, but perhaps causing stomach cramps or the like.
User avatar
cloudy-a
Member
 
Posts: 221
Joined: 19 Jan 2007
Location: Miami Beach, FL


Postby Andeedo on January 24th, 2007, 10:04 pm 

Would't some fermentation in the intestines be good for digestion? It's been a long time since I studies metabolism. Aren't fermentation products easier to prep for ox-phos than whole sugars?

I say, GO BACTERIA!!! you can have those crappy substrate level ATPs! I'm too lazy.

Don't take health advise from me though, please, I have a less than model health regimin and am pleasantly uneducated in human physiology ;)
Last edited by Andeedo on January 24th, 2007, 10:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Andeedo
Member
 
Posts: 107
Joined: 08 Jan 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Likes received:1


Postby Andeedo on January 24th, 2007, 10:06 pm 

HAHA! This post gave me an idea for a trully heinous experiment involving a controlled diet regimen and litmus paper ;)
Andeedo
Member
 
Posts: 107
Joined: 08 Jan 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Likes received:1


Postby BioWizard on January 25th, 2007, 12:43 am 

Yes, fermentation is sometimes good for the digestion process, not when it happens in the colon though (that's why lactose intolerance is so intolerable). For example, milk is fermented to yeild yogurt, which is more easily digested since the lactose is readily broken down to lactate, and can be readily routed to the TCA cycle. A lactose intolerant person can ingest yogurt, but not milk, because he lacks the enzyme lactase which breaks down lactose, and thus the lactose goes through the system unprocessed and ends up in the colon where bacteria break it down anerobically, releasing large about of CO2, causing extreme pain and discomfort.

As for the whole thing about fruits at night, I'm not buying. I eat an apple and an orange everynight before bed. Andeedo, got some litmus? :)
User avatar
BioWizard
Science Admin
 
Posts: 10134
Joined: 24 Mar 2005
Location: United States
Likes received:50
Blog: View Blog (4)


Postby cloudy-a on January 25th, 2007, 1:59 pm 

After some thought, I can see how at night would be less favorable than morning bc you go for 8 hours or so without going to the bathroom at night and increase the time frame for fermentation to occur in the colon, whereas during the day you are voiding more frequently...

(This whole conversation is taking an ugly turn btw. I'd hate to be the poor grad student that gets stuck with Andeedo's proposed project.)
User avatar
cloudy-a
Member
 
Posts: 221
Joined: 19 Jan 2007
Location: Miami Beach, FL


Fermentation in stomach resulting from fruit

Postby B0L0 on February 12th, 2007, 12:57 am 

I read nutrition books sometimes. The general rule is do not eat fruit after meals. Fruit by itself leaves the stomach after 30 mins bananas like 45 minutes. However mixing fruit with meat or other food groups, causes fermentation. So the general rule is to eat fruit by itself. Recall on this subject is hazy, that I have, for further clarity you could follow this train of thought and search further!!
B0L0
Forum Neophyte
 
Posts: 16
Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Location: SLUM


Re: Fermentation in stomach resulting from fruit

Postby cloudy-a on February 12th, 2007, 12:17 pm 

B0L0 wrote:I read nutrition books sometimes. The general rule is do not eat fruit after meals. Fruit by itself leaves the stomach after 30 mins bananas like 45 minutes. However mixing fruit with meat or other food groups, causes fermentation. So the general rule is to eat fruit by itself. Recall on this subject is hazy, that I have, for further clarity you could follow this train of thought and search further!!


I have heard that but have not found been able to find any hard scientific data to support that statement. For one thing, fermentation is an important if not essential part of colonic digestion, so I don't know why fermentation itself is always spoken of as a bad thing.
User avatar
cloudy-a
Member
 
Posts: 221
Joined: 19 Jan 2007
Location: Miami Beach, FL


Postby cloudy-a on February 12th, 2007, 12:44 pm 

I did some searching on Pubmed this morning and did find that polyphenols found in berries inhibit proteases in the stomach, specifically trypsin. This slows down protein digestion. In a second paper, I found that protein that is not digested in the stomach passes in to colon where fermentaion may release products that trigger the human inflammatory response or alter the colonic bacterial population, but this is not fully proven yet. So, my apologies bolo if I was dismissive in my earlier post.

I should reiterate however that not all fermentation in the colon is bad. It is actually necessary for starch breakdown. It is fermentation of protein and of lactose, as Biowizard pointed out earlier, that is potentially detrimental.
User avatar
cloudy-a
Member
 
Posts: 221
Joined: 19 Jan 2007
Location: Miami Beach, FL



Return to Health and Nutrition

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests