Doorways causes forgetting

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Doorways causes forgetting

Postby wolfhnd on November 19th, 2011, 1:06 am 

We’ve all experienced it: The frustration of entering a room and forgetting what we were going to do. Or get. Or find.

New research from University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Gabriel Radvansky suggests that passing through doorways is the cause of these memory lapses.

“Entering or exiting through a doorway serves as an ‘event boundary’ in the mind, which separates episodes of activity and files them away,” Radvansky explains.

“Recalling the decision or activity that was made in a different room is difficult because it has been compartmentalized.”

http://newsinfo.nd.edu/news/27476-walki ... rch-shows/
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Re: Doorways causes forgetting

Postby owleye on November 19th, 2011, 10:26 am 

wolfhnd wrote:We’ve all experienced it: The frustration of entering a room and forgetting what we were going to do. Or get. Or find.

New research from University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Gabriel Radvansky suggests that passing through doorways is the cause of these memory lapses.

“Entering or exiting through a doorway serves as an ‘event boundary’ in the mind, which separates episodes of activity and files them away,” Radvansky explains.

“Recalling the decision or activity that was made in a different room is difficult because it has been compartmentalized.”

http://newsinfo.nd.edu/news/27476-walki ... rch-shows/


Interesting. Would the doorway require a door or could it be considered a passage way, say from one room to another? Would halls make a difference? I know in rites of passage, doors and other entrances are often marked with statues and images of lions or dragons or some such in order to ensure separation, it being the first stage of the rites, before one enters into a whole new world of experiences. I suppose all this might be unnecessary, if it is only the doorway that does it. Gabriel, I suppose, might work just as well.

In any case, the key point seems to be that events in our life make a difference, and passing through doorways appear to cause an event to be noted. A recorded event (at least from the brain's perspective) must have some interesting linkage that serves not only as a time stamp, but has directionality to it, allowing a transition in which the old is lost in favor of the new. Sort of like a quantum collapse of the wave-function. (I suspect scientists would object here, but I'm only making an analogy about the loss of information that results in forgetting.)

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